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Feeding a Need

Feeding a Need

ORIGINAL SOURCE

terpsagainsthunger_artwork

TAH in “Terps Do Good” Video

TAH in “Terps Do Good” Video

 


Terps Against Hunger competed in the 2016 Do Good Challenge. The competition challenged students to do the “most good” over an eight week period. Over 80 teams competed in waves of pitch competitions to make it to the final round. TAH was able to raise $54,000 during the competition which is equal to feeding 227 families of five for a year. Terps Against Hunger won first place in the project pitches as well as won audience favorite. You can read more about the competition from the Diamondback article here.

BTN LiveBIG: This Maryland Day, Terps hunger for big impact

BTN LiveBIG: This Maryland Day, Terps hunger for big impact

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By Brian Summerfield

Part carnival. Part expo. All fun. It’s Maryland Day, which happens tomorrow at the University of Maryland’s campus in College Park.

Along with games, activities and entertainment, Maryland Day features information about a variety of student-run organizations at the university. And Terps Against Hunger, fresh off of its win in Maryland’s annual Do Good Challenge, is looking to make another big splash at the event tomorrow.

“[Maryland Day] is an invitation to the community to see what the university’s all about,” said Josh Turskey, a sophomore majoring in architecture and the current vice president of Terps Against Hunger. “We’re opening our doors and our arms and saying, ‘Come be a part of our community.’

“Terps Against Hunger has a similar mission,” he added. “We really want to engage the community.”

To do that, Turskey and other student volunteers will operate three different tables within their station during Maryland Day. One will have educational materials on Terps Against Hunger, for those who want to support or get involved with the organization. Another will serve as a packing station for preparing healthy meals for families in need. And a third will educate attendees on the problem of hunger in the local community and beyond.

A recent food packing event organized by Terps Against Hunger

A recent food packing event organized by Terps Against Hunger

Turskey is deeply committed to fighting hunger insecurity. His interest in the cause extends back to when he was high school in Sykesville, Md.

“I went to a very similar packing event during my freshman year when I was 14,” he said. “While there, I came across some statistics. For example, every five seconds, a child dies from hunger. That’s such a significant number. It really stuck with me.”

He started a not-for-profit to address this problem while he was still in high school. But when Turskey came to College Park, he wasn’t aware of Terps Against Hunger, nor was he actively seeking to join any such organization. Like many new college students, his mind was on getting settled in his new surroundings.

However, during his first few weeks, he saw a familiar sight while strolling through a book fair on campus: a food packet on display. That’s how he found out about Terps Against Hunger, and he got involved with the group soon after that.

Now, Turskey spends about 20-25 hours a week on variety of tasks for the organization, ranging from food-packing events to service trips to Baltimore and Washington, D.C., where he and fellow students personally prepare and serve meals to those in need.

“We want to connect with the people we serve so we can serve them better,” he said.

It’s a big commitment on top of his studies — one that will likely grow as 2016 progresses. Terps Against Hunger is on track to pack more than a million meals this year. And, about one week after Maryland Day, Turskey will assume his new role as president of the organization. Additionally, he plans to get more involved with the Washington, D.C., chapter of its parent organization, Kids Against Hunger.

“Hunger has been put on my heart,” Turskey said. “It’s a cause I want to continue to serve.”

By Brian Summerfield

Terps Against Hunger, Medfund win grand prizes at Do Good Challenge

Terps Against Hunger, Medfund win grand prizes at Do Good Challenge

ORIGINAL SOURCE

Sophomore architecture major Joshua Turskey speaks about his program, Terps Against Hunger, which won big at the Do Good Challenge held in Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center on April 19. (Tom Hausman/The Diamondback)
Published April 19 at 11:12 PM

University of Maryland student organizations Terps Against Hunger and Medfund each won a $5,000 grand prize at Tuesday night’s Do Good Challenge, which awarded $20,000 overall to student philanthropy teams.

The challenge — now in its fifth year — was sponsored by Morgan Stanley, the public policy school and the business school, drawing 87 student teams that competed for eight weeks. The event, held at the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, involved the final three teams in the project and venture categories each giving a five-minute presentation to a panel of three judges in hopes of securing the grand prize.

“We’ve talked about this sort of being the combination of American Idoland Shark Tank,” said Toby Egan, the faculty adviser for the challenge and a professor at the public policy school.

The three project teams, which Egan defined as “event-centric” and affiliated with a parent organization, were No Taboo. Period., Preventing Sexual Assault and Terps Against Hunger. The venture teams, which are independent, student-run organizations, were Annie’s Children, the Love Blanket Project and Medfund.

Terps Against Hunger, also the winner of the $2,500 audience choice award, provides meals to food-insecure families in the Washington metropolitan area.

“It’s just such a great feeling just because I know all these meals — it’s not going towards me, but it’s going straight to the families of D.C.,” said presenter and sophomore architecture major Joshua Turskey. “I’m really excited to see what we can do with this money.”

Patrick Prommel, Medfund co-founder and a senior finance major, said the demands of the hospital in Bolivia that his organization supports will determine how the award money is used.

Preventing Sexual Assault won the $2,500 second-place award in the project category, and No Taboo. Period. won the $1,000 third-place award. In the ventures category, Annie’s Children won second place and $2,500, while the Love Blanket Project won third place and $1,000.

Seven other semi-finalists were also offered a chance to win the showcase audience award of $750 before the Do Good Challenge began. People who attended the event were given “Do Good Dollars” to vote for their favorite semi-finalist, and the top two teams pitched their organization to the audience. A Helpful Hello, an organization that provides resources for students to talk to homeless people, won the award through a text-message voting system.

While audience members decided the winners for the showcase audience award and audience choice award, three judges, including former Do Good Challenge winner Sagar Doshi, decided the grand prize winners in the project and venture categories.

“The way that we judge them is really a combination of how well they align their mission with the execution of their organization and the way that they implement either their venture or project,” said Egan, who helped to award accelerator funding to 30 or 40 student groups in the fall and has continued to coach the student leaders.

University President Wallace Loh attended the event and called the presentations “inspiring.”

“This is the best of what America has to offer,” he said. “Students applying their talents to make a difference in the world, making an impact on people’s lives. I am so proud of them.”

Glen Burnie East: Toyota office teams up with Terps to combat hunger

Glen Burnie East: Toyota office teams up with Terps to combat hunger

ORIGINAL SOURCE

Nick Staten packs individual meals at a half-day food packing event at the Toyota Central Atlantic Region office on April 11 in Glen Burnie. 74,000 meals were donated to the Maryland Food Bank. (Courtesy Photo / HANDOUT)
Nick Staten packs individual meals at a half-day food packing event at the Toyota Central Atlantic Region office on April 11 in Glen Burnie. 74,000 meals were donated to the Maryland Food Bank. (Courtesy Photo / HANDOUT)

 

Amy Laque • Contact Reporter

Correspondent

April 18, 2016

University of Maryland student and Terps Against Hunger volunteer Sarah Barreca wanted to make a difference.

When she asked her father Keith Barreca, dealer Performance manager for Toyota‘s Central Atlantic Region for advice, the pair did not anticipate Toyota would respond in a such big way.

“I mentioned it to my dad over the dinner table,” Sarah said. “I even gave him a brochure — and I sold him. He started talking to his co-workers.”

After Keith approached Toyota General Manager Tim Bliss and Assistant General Manager Bob Zeinstra, a partnership between Toyota and the Terps was formed to deliver thousands of meals in a food-packing event on April 11 at the regional Toyota office on Baymeadow Drive.

“When I mentioned it to the assistant general manager, I thought it would probably result in a small, private donation,” Keith Barreca said. “In reality, everyone stepped up big time. The team surpassed expectations.”

Toyota’s Central Atlantic Region office purchased the necessary goods, including rice, soy, dehydrated vegetables and vitamin and mineral powders. Sixty of the office’s 75 employees participated.

The original goal was 45,000 meals, but the end result was 74,000. Meals were packed and loaded onto Toyota Tundra pickup trucks for a caravan delivery to the Maryland Food Bank.

“It’s not often that we get to stop what we normally do to give back to the community,” Bliss said. “74,000 meals show what this team can do when we’re focused and determined. We’ve helped families in need in Glen Burnie, right here in our back yard.”

Terps Against Hunger President and University of Maryland senior Jonathan Fix told volunteers they packed at an incredible rate.

“The average rate is 200 meals per volunteer,” Fix said. “Your rate today was 350 meals per volunteer. You should be very proud of yourselves. Toyota is going help a lot of families who are local to where your office is.”

Maryland Food Bank CEO Beth Martino expressed her gratitude for the generosity of Toyota and Terps Against Hunger. Martino said the meals would go a long way toward feeding hungry households in Maryland, and assured the groups the meals would fly off the shelves.

“It’s amazing how a few dozen people pitching in for a couple of hours can change people’s lives,” Sarah Barreca said. “Little efforts like that can influence so much. Every single package we made will go into someone else’s hands.”

Terps Against Hunger in Maryland Pride Video

Terps Against Hunger in Maryland Pride Video

 

The University of Maryland released a video at the beginning of the Spring 2016 semester focused on the impact students at Maryland are making. The first example shows scenes from us hosting and distributing meals from the 2015 Homecoming event were thousands of volunteers gathered to pack over 250,000 meals. All of the meals were distributed locally throughout the DC-Metro area.